Lego Report 1

Dec 26, 2020

The lego kit is packaged in four different boxes that need to be completed in order. I was relived to see this. It keeps the 9000+ piece set from being completely overwhelming.

The pieces come in numbered bags and each step of the instructions tell you what bag you'll need.

Wish me luck.


Paul Dec 26, 2020
If you want it to be EXTRA fun, you open all the boxes and all the bags and dump the pieces onto the floor in one big pile before you start.
I once basically did this with an Airfix kit.

Andy Latham Dec 26, 2020
If struggling, it can be helpful to organise pieces by colo....oh.

Adrian Dec 26, 2020
I cannot wait seeing this flooded and seeing a recreation of a ship battle put into the colosseum.

Martin 'Martinland' Schemitsch Dec 26, 2020
Very nice!

Wait ... did they - of all places - spell the Roman numerals on these boxes wrong? "IIII"?!? Of course it should be "I", "II", "III", and "IV".

No wonder the world is coming to an end...

All the best anyway ... and good luck! :-D

Ron Gilbert Dec 26, 2020
Yes, the Roman numerals are wrong.  It was the first thing I noticed.  Maybe IV is too hard for kids... but so is a 9000 piece set. I'm dying to know what marketing decision resulted in this.

Nor Treblig Dec 26, 2020
@Martin 'Martinland' Schemitsch: There are different variants for writing Roman numbers.

Since we are talking about the Colosseum (Rome) this actually seems to be an appropriate choice, see this blog post for pictures and an explanation:
https://threesixty360.wordpress.com/2011/01/01/roman-numerals-not-quite-so-simple/

Martinland Dec 26, 2020
Ron Gilbert: So we both seem to be sticklers for detail (sometimes)... ;)

Nor: This is most interesting indeed, thank you for that!

Iron Curtain Dec 27, 2020
This just shows you, we don't always have such a clear picture of our past that things we would find "unrealistic" are things we actually don't find believable, despite them actually existing in the past.

Iron Curtain Dec 27, 2020
Also, per the comments in Nor Treblig's link, Roman Numerals have been pretty inconsistent over the millennia: http://www.web40571.clarahost.co.uk/roman/howtheywork.htm

Djoseph Dec 27, 2020
It's not to scale with lego minifigures is it...?

Bobe Dec 27, 2020
I hope you enjoy the build! I look forward to reading about it. I suppose as a game developer you crave a certain amount of complexity. That beast can never be fully satiated. I've been doing gigantic, detailed 3D scenes in Blender since that's cheaper than LEGO. If you crave 90k instead of 9k, then this may scratch it. LEGO is an amazing gateway to becoming an engineer or artist. Reinforces the idea that big goals can be achieved with tiny little steps.

Vassbak Dec 27, 2020
Best of luck! Remember to not create personal stress to finish it, but take your time.

Marco B Dec 27, 2020
@Nor Treblig: Thank you, I've learned something new today!

Nor Treblig Dec 27, 2020
@Djoseph:
Measurements of the Colosseum model according to Lego are (including that grey base I assume):
height: 0.27 m, base: 0.59 m x 0.52 m

A minifigure is 0.04 m in height and assuming 1.7 m as an average height of humans and 48 m for the Colosseum I get following dimensions:
height: 1.13 m, base: 4.45 m x 3.67 m
Now that would be A LOT more bricks!


@Ron: Do you plan to disassemble it at some point in time?
And do you plan to ever assemble it again?

I wonder how careful you need to be disassembling and packaging it, so you will be able to build it ever again...

Or you just put everything together into the big box and sell it on eBay...

Ron Gilbert Dec 27, 2020
I was just thinking about that today.  If I do disassemble it, it won't be for years and by then I probably won't care. I'm thinking compost (legos are biodegradable, right?)

The set wasn't really made for minifigs. As you noted, the scale is wrong.  

I also toyed with the idea of buying two sets and building a period appropriate completed colosseum. But thats a bunch of money.

Zak Phoenix McKracken Dec 27, 2020
Wow, il Colosseo!
Challenging, good luck!

Nor Treblig Dec 29, 2020
Building a complete one would be an interesting idea!
You could do it in realtime which means about 3000 daily blog posts. Unless you scale time to its size, then you have about 16 days.

Johan Windh Dec 29, 2020
And for a complete period piece you'd also need to custom create the canvas around the top. Would be neat though.

Peter Jan 01, 2021
Good luck, I hope you'll enjoy building the exact same arch 300 times. :)

Why did you pick this specific one?

Simon Simon 4d ago
Unfortunately most of the bricks from current Lego sets are not biodegradable. The company seems to have plans to change this in future.
However there is quite a used marked for Lego sets, if you ever want to get rid of the set, people will easily buy used and also assembled Lego models. The beauty of Lego is that it can be passed on and on.

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